The Classical Association of Virginia
 Promoting Classics in The Old Dominion Since 1910


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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

President MARK KEITH, Riverbend High School
  pallanteum @comcast.net 11809 Clarence Dr.
Fredericksburg, VA  22407
Vice President LIANE HOUGHTALIN University of Mary Washington
  lhoughta@umw.edu Dept. of Classics, Philosophy and Religion
Trinkle 240, 1301 College Ave.

Fredericksburg, VA  22401
Secretary BRIANNA MCHUGH, Yorktown High School
  brianna.mchugh@apsva.us 5200 Yorktown Blvd., Arlington, VA 22207
Treasurer ANDREA WEISKOPF, Seneca Ridge Middle School
  aweiskopf@hotmail.com
Editor, Newsletter ADRIENNE CUNNINGHAM, Bishop O'Connell High School
  acunningham@bishopoconnell.org 6600 N. Little Falls Rd., Arlington, VA  22213
Editor, Website cHARLAINE d. lUNSFORD, Woodrow Wilson High School
  charlaine.lunsford@pps.k12.va.us 1401 Elmhurst Lane, Portsmouth, VA 23701
Director, Latin Tournament KEVIN S. JEFFERSON, Woodgrove High School
  kevinsjefferson@gmail.com 901 E. Roanoke Road, Sterling, VA 20164
Director, Latin Essay Contest JOHN F. MILLER, University of Virginia
  jfm4j@virginia.edu University of Virginia, Department of Classics, B018 Cocke Hall, P.O. Box 400788, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4788
Director, Classical Essay Contest NADIA GHOSHEH, Hayfield Secondary School
  nadiaghosheh@gmail.com
7630 Telegraph Rd.
Alexandria, VA  22315
Registrar, Latin Tournament Kathy Smerke
  ksmerke@gmail.com 4211 Whitacre Road, Fairfax VA 22032
Historian Linda Montross
  amovos@aol.com 52 Spinnaker Court, Heathsville, VA 22473
Director, Teacher Placement Service Jon Mikalson, University of Virginia
  jdm9x@virginia.edu University of Virginia, Department of Classics, B002 Cocke Hall, P.O. Box 400788, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4788
Chair, Membership Committee
(Elem., Middle, and High School)
PATTY LISTER, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology
  phlister@cox.net  6560 Braddock Rd.
Alexandria, VA  22312
Chair, Membership Committee
(College and University)
JANICE SIEGEL, Hampden-Sydney College
  jsiegel@hsc.edu Maples 007, Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943
Members-at-Large CLIFF BROENIMAN, Maggie Walker Governor's School for Govt. and Intern. Studies
  cbroeniman@juno.com 2005 Cambridge Dr., Richmond, VA 23238
  CYGNET STEER, Radford University, Virginia Tech
  cygnet@vt.edu 106 Roanoke St., Christiansburg, VA 24703
Immediate Past President FRED FRANKO, Hollins University
  gfranko@hollins.edu Dept. of Philosophy and Classics
7916 Williamson Road, Roanoke, VA 24020
Vice President for CAMWS TRUDY BECKER, Virginia Tech
  thbecker@vt.edu Department of History
431 Major Williams Hall, 200 Stanger St.
Blacksburg, VA  24061-0117

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MINUTES

Spring 2016 Meeting (Hollins University, Roanoke)
Fall 2015 Meeting (Mary Baldwin College, Staunton)
Spring 2015 Meeting (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Fall 2014 Meeting (Fredericksburg Hospitality House, Fredericksburg)
Spring 2014 Meeting (College of William & Mary, Williamsburg)
Fall 2013 Meeting (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring 2013 Meeting (University of Richmond, Richmond)
Fall 2012 Meeting (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring 2012 Meeting (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg)
Fall 2011 Meeting (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring 2011 Meeting (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Fall Meeting 2010 (Omni Hotel, Richmond) N.B. No business meeting held
Spring Meeting 2010 (St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School, Alexandria)
Fall Meeting 2009 (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring Meeting 2009 (Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney)
Fall Meeting 2008 (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring Meeting 2008 (College of William & Mary, Williamsburg)
Fall Meeting 2007 (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring Meeting 2007 (Randolph-Macon College, Ashland)
Fall Meeting 2006 (University of Virginia, Charlottesville)
Spring Meeting 2006 (Midlothian High School, Midlothian)

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CAV Celebrates 100 Years

hunter rawlings
Hunter Rawlings speaks to a joint meeting of CAV and CAMWS-SS
on the classical education and applications of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson (October 2010).



FALL CAV CENTENNIAL MEETING
Saturday, October 30, 2010
Omni Hotel, Richmond
(in conjunction with CAMWS-Southern Section)

Lecture by Hunter Rawlings, Cornell University, on Virginia's Founding Fathers and the Classics

Reception

Banquet


SPRING CAV CENTENNIAL MEETING
Saturday, May 7, 2011
University of Virginia, Charlottesville

Meeting theme: The Past, Present, and Future of Classics in Virginia

Guest speaker: Ward Briggs, University of South Carolina on "Virginia, The Civil War and the Creation of American Classical Scholarship"

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HISTORY OF THE CAV

Julie Anne Herrick, CAV's past historian, researched the origins of our humble organization and submitted the following report:

The very first meeting of the Classical Association of Virginia took place on Thanksgiving Day, November 24, 1910, at John Marshall High School in Richmond.

Prior to this meeting, Professor Thomas Fitzhugh of the University of Virginia sent a letter, dated November 11, 1910, announcing this meeting to the editors of several leading Virginia newspapers. In this letter, he invited all educators and citizens who held an interest in the classics to attend an organizational meeting to be held in the music room of John Marshall High School in Richmond at 9:30 A.M. on November 24, 1910. The object of this Classical Section of the Association of College and Secondary Schools in Virginia was to be the promotion of classical teaching and culture in Virginia. Fitzhugh went on to add:

"This cause is a great and good one, because it upholds cultural standards and academic sincerity, which are everywhere being imperiled by the American spirit of academic commercialism, with its inevitable lust after numbers and consequent cheapening of academic standards."

In response to Fitzhugh's letter, several editors and prominent educators wrote letters of support. For example, the editor of the Charlottesville Daily Progress wrote on November 12, 1910: "Let no man deceive himself: some culture will result from studying anything, but no one can be generously cultured without studying Latin."

Those present at the first meeting elected an executive committee: President - Professor Thomas Fitzhugh of the University of Virginia; Vice President - W. Gordon McCabe, former headmaster of Richmond High School; Secretary/Treasurer - Clement Carrington Read, instructor at Richmond High School; Professor Edwin W. Bowen of Randolph-Macon College in Ashland; and William M. Black, principal of Lynchburg High School.

This organization agreed to meet annually under the auspices of the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of Virginia. The next meeting was set for the fall of 1911 in Norfolk.


CAV HISTORIAN CRAFTS PRESS RELEASE:
CLASSICAL STUDIES ALIVE AND WELL IN VIRGINIA

If Professor Thomas Fitzhugh were alive today, he would be well pleased with the state of Latin and Greek in Virginia. This former Classics professor from the University of Virginia would be delighted that over 17,000 Virginia students engage in formal study of the Classics each year. From the Latin classroom to the Governor's Latin Academy, to the Virginia Junior (and Senior) Classical League, to Certamina competitions (quiz bowls), to the Augusta County Institute for Classical Studies, a wide variety of opportunities exists today for the classically minded learner. Latin teachers and professors across the state enthusiastically participate in professional organizations such as the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV), the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), the American Classical League (ACL), as well as regional workshops, e.g. the Randolph-Macon Saturday Seminars for Latin teachers. This promotion of classical teaching and classical culture was exactly what Dr. Fitzhugh had in mind.

Ninety years ago, Dr. Fitzhugh invited all educators and citizens who held an interest in the classics to attend an organizational meeting whose purpose would be the promotion of classical teaching and classical culture. At that meeting on November 24, 1910, the Classical Association of Virginia was born. As Dr. Fitzhugh stated, "This cause is a great and good one, because it upholds cultural standards and academic sincerity, which are everywhere being imperiled by the American spirit of commercialism, with its inevitable lust after numbers and consequent cheapening of academic standards."

This year, the CAV celebrates its ninetieth anniversary as an organization dedicated to the promotion of classics. With a long and rich history, the CAV has sponsored several lectures each year on such topics as ancient literature, classical art and archaeology, classical mythology, and ancient history. In addition, the CAV sponsors several academic contests every year open to middle and high school students: the Latin Tournament (a test of grammar and translation taken by 603 Virginia students last year), the Classical Essay Contest, and a Latin Essay Contest. The CAV also recognizes an outstanding Latin teacher each year with the Angela B. Lloyd Book Award. True to Dr. Fitzhugh's dream, professors, teachers, and students are being nurtured and challenged today through a vast network of classics enthusiasts.

What might have delighted Dr. Fitzhugh even more than the success of the CAV itself is the rise of several additional classical organizations that also carry on the torch of classical studies throughout Virginia. The Virginia Junior Classical League (VJCL), a state affiliate of the National Junior Classical League (Latin club for middle and high school Latin students) currently has 5,800 members. The VJCL just held its annual sate convention in Richmond with about 1,250 delegates in academic, graphic arts, and oratory contests. Also at this convention, Latin professors and college students gave lectures on a variety of classical topics. In addition, several informal groups meet monthly, usually in teachers' homes, including CVLTA (Central Virginia Latin Teachers Association), FCLTA (Fairfax County area Latin Teachers Association), and FALTA (Fredericksburg Area Latin Teachers Association). Teachers bring an idea or a teaching technique as well as a covered dish to share with colleagues. Most Latin teachers encourage their students to take the National Latin Exam. Last year, 10, 695 Virginia Latin students took the exam , more than any other state, with 215 public and private school participating (the largest number in the country).

The Augusta County Institute for Classical Studies provides one of the most inspiring examples of students getting involved in the classical world. Created by Doug Bunch, a junior at the College of William and Mary, the Institute brings classics to third-, fourth-, and fifth-graders in the form of a two-week summer camp. Directed by Doug and Matt Webb, a junior at the University of Maryland, the elementary students learn about word derivations, Classical Latin, mythology, and daily life in Ancient Rome. This Institute is an excellent example of the convergence of creativity, energy, and a love of the classics.

Latin is alive and well in all corners of the Commonwealth. Each spring, the Classical Studies faculty at Virginia Tech holds a Classics Day program for 90 third-graders at Kipps Elementary School in Blacksburg. According to program coordinator Dr. Trudy Harrington Becker, the third-graders create their own myths, conduct a scavenger hunt for Classical architecture on the Virginia Tech campus, writing their names Greek and Latin, and visit an antiquities museum. If the Classics Day program at Virginia Tech is any indication, even younger students can enjoy and benefit from Latin.

College admissions officers take notice when they see that a prospective student has studied the classics. According to an ongoing survey of college admissions officers conducted by the Maryland Senior Classical League, Lee Morgan, Senior Assistant Dean of Admission at the University of Virginia, states:

"We [admissions officers] are impressed when we see that students take Latin and/or Greek in high school. We consider such study evidence that the student truly values and enjoys learning... Ancient culture, history, and philosophy are also vital for understanding current systems of government, values, etc., and therefore we consider this excellent preparation for college work as well as for life in general."

Latin can be beneficial in graduate school as well. Dean Taylor Reveley of the William and Mary School of Law observes:

"Anyone interested in becoming a lawyer would benefit materially from studying Latin, not because of the episodic Latin words and phrases still afoot in contemporary law but for the THINKING involved in coming to grips, truly, with Latin, for the understanding that learning Latin fosters about the structure of the English language, and for the sense studying Latin provides of things Roman -- things which have been so central to the evolution of our civilization."

Through these many different programs and activities, the study of the classics remains alive and well in Virginia. Would that Dr. Fitzhugh could see Virginia now!

- Julie Anne W. Herrick
Historian of the Classical Association of Virginia

A BRIEF HISTORY

The Classical Association of Virginia was founded in November, 1910 to promote classical teaching and culture in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The first meeting was held at John Marshall High School in Richmond, and its first Executive Committee consisted of two college faculty members and three high school teachers. The CAV from its very beginnings has promoted and nurtured the collaboration of college faculty and high school Latin teachers in its meetings and programs over the last one hundred years. Through its inspiration of both teachers and faculty the CAV has contributed significantly to the long and stong tradition of the study of Latin, Greek, and the classical world in Virginia. Now, one hundred years later, Virginia can take pride in its dynamic classics community and can boast of enrollments in high school Latin and enrollments in college and university Latin, Greek, and classical studies courses that rank among the highest of the nation.

The CAV's motto, chosen in 1910, is a quote from Vergil's Aeneid 1.203: Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit. As we look back over the 100-year historu of the Classical Association of Virginia and remember those many who contributed to the success of its mission, we can respond, "haec nunc meminisse iuvat."

Program of
The Classical Association of Virginia
First Annual Session, 1911
Maury High School, Norfolk

Thomas Fitzhugh, University of Virginia, President
W. Gordon McCabe, Richmond, Vice President
C. Carrington Read, Richmond, Secretary-Treasurer
 

Tuesday, November 28th, 4:00 PM

1. Why Should the Classics Be Studied, and How? - Paper by Professor James W. Kern of Washington and Lee University. Discussion by Professor Walter A. Montgomery of William and Mary College.
2. Certain Means by Which Latin May be Made More Vital and Interesting to Pupils - Paper by Miss Sallie S. Lovelace of Roanoke High School. Discussion by Professor Herbert C. Lipscomb or Randolph-Macon Woman's College.
3. The Elimination of Some of the Defects in the Present Teaching of Latin - Paper by Professor William P. Dickey of Richmond College. Discussion by Miss Nora B. Fraser of Sweet Briar College.
 

Wednesday, November 29th, 4:30 PM

1. The Great Opportunity of the Schools - Paper by Headmaster E. Reinhold Rogers of the Jefferson School for Boys. Discussion by Principal Francis M. Bacon of Norfolk Academy.
2. The Appeal of Greek to the Modern Student - Paper by Miss Mabel K. Whiteside of Randolph-Macon Woman's College. Discussion by Professor William A. Harris of Richmond College.
3. The Classical Element in the Poetry of Tennyson - Paper by Mr. Frank P. Brent of Lancaster High School. Discussion by Professor John N. Brown or Emory and Henry College.

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